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DeSales University Faculty Publications

Dr. Aidin Amirshokoohi

Amirshokoohi, A., & Jubilan, B. (2018). "Filipino Preservice Teachers’ Level of Environmental Literacy and Views toward STS and STS-based Instruction." The International Journal of Science, Mathematics and Technology Learning 25 (2): 53-68. doi:10.18848/2327-7971/CGP/v25i02/53-68.

ABSTRACT

Implementation of Science, Technology, Society (STS) curriculum requires that teachers’ beliefs be compatible with the STS framework and that teachers possess a positive attitude and sense of willingness and confidence to adopt STS-based instruction. This study aimed to explore Filipino elementary preservice teachers’ levels of environmental literacy and views toward STS issues and STS-based instruction.

Amirshokoohi, A. & Wisniewski, D. (May 2018). "Constructing Understanding in Mathematics Methods Course." Teaching Children Mathematics, 24(7) 443-451.

ABSTRACT

Key elements can enhance teacher candidates’ understanding, interest, and confidence with learning and teaching mathematics while decreasing their math-related anxiety and fear.

Article may be accessed via https://www.nctm.org/Publications/Teaching-Children-Mathematics/2018/Vol24/Issue7/Constructing-Understanding-in-a-Mathematics-Methods-Course/

 

Kazempour, M. & Amirshokoohi, A. (July 2018). “Evolution Education in Iran: Shattering Myths about Teaching Evolution in an Islamic State.” In H. Deniz & L. Borgerding. (Eds.), Evolution Education around the World. New York: Springer.

ABSTRACT

This chapter will examine the teaching of evolution in the public education system of the Islamic Republic of Iran. The goal of this chapter is to examine the status of evolution education in the Iranian education system and address inaccurate presumptions that are seeded in the Western views of Iran as a theocratic state with dilapidated ideals and perspectives. Through examination of existing literature and previous reviews and analyses of Iran’s science textbooks and nationally mandated curriculum content, this chapter will attempt to shed light on:
(a) the views of nature of science projected in the science education standards, (b) the depiction and description of the evolutionary emergence of life and concepts such as natural selection, mutation, and adaptation in the K-12 science content, (c) the history of science and evolution education in Iran, and (d) possible factors that have contributed to Iran’s relatively in-depth and accurate attention to evolution
education when compared to neighboring countries in the region. There are areas pertaining to evolution education in Iran that remain unexplored and suitable for future research. Further inquiry is necessary into understanding the implementation of the Iranian evolution curriculum and the students, teachers, and general public’s beliefs and attitude with respect to evolution.

Dr. Michelle Bolger

Bolger, M. (2018). Predicting arrest probability across time: An exploration of competing risk perspectives. Journal of criminal justice, 59, 92-109.

ABSTRACT

Objectives: Criminal involvement is non-randomly distributed across individuals and across groups, resulting in differential probabilities of arrest. Thus, various predictors of arrest probability across time were examined for different groups.

Methods: Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997, the current study examined latent class membership in the probability of arrest over a 15-year time span starting when participants were 12-16 years-old and ending when they were 28-31 years-old. Latent class regressions were employed to prospectively investigate whether demographic and criminological risk factors from the base wave could predict class membership.

Results: Results from the latent class growth analyses resulted in three to four classes characterized by an abstainer group, a stable, low-level group, an adolescent-limited group, and a stable moderate-level chromic group. In general, race, poverty, and other risk factors exhibited weak and inconsistent effects in predicting class membership. In contrast, being male and self-reported delinquency were consistent predictors of class membership.

Conclusion: Across model comparisons and net of other predictors, self-reported delinquency was a strong predictor of class membership, suggesting that differential arrest probability is predominantly explained by time-stable delinquent behavior.

 

Bolger, M. and Bolger, P.C. (2018). Predicting fear of crime: Results from a community survey of a small city. American Journal of Criminal Justice, 2019(44), 334-351.

ABSTRACT

Several studies have examined predictors surrounding fear of crime. Fear of crime has generally been conceptualized as an affective emotional state regarding concern over victimization or as a cognitive state of perceived risk of victimization. While there are many potential predictors of fear of crime, there are two main groups of predictors: individual demographics and neighborhood physical and social disorder. Previous research has predominantly focused on large, urban cities. Less research has been published surrounding smaller cities and towns. As such, the current study involved a mailed household survey of a small city around 80,000 residents in Pennsylvania. The study examined demographic predictors in line with the vulnerability model and neighborhood contextual predictors of residents' fear of crime associated with the incivilities model. While the main analyses employed a more affective measure of fear of crime, a supplementary analysis using a measure of perceived neighborhood crime problems was examined as well. Findings revealed that in line with previous research, females and minorities were more likely to be fearful of crime. However, less favorable views of local police, more physical disorder, and more social disorder were also related to greater fear of crime and accounted for a much larger proportion of the variance explaining fear of crime. Supplementary findings strongly supported the importance of neighborhood contextual factors in predicting perceptions of crime problems, including the views of police, physical, and social disorder. However, no demographic factors predicted perceived neighborhood crime problems. Implications and limitations of teh study findings are discussed. 

 

Bolger, M., Meldrum, R. C., and Barnes, J.C. (2018). The contributions of maternal and paternal self-control to child and adolescent self-control: A latent class analysis of intergenerational transmission. Journal of Development and Life-Course Criminology, 4(3), 251-275.

ABSTRACT

Purpose: Recent research provides evidence of intergenerational continuity in self-control. This body of research, however, can be advanced in several ways to enhance our understanding of this association.

Methods: We add to theis literature by examining whether maternal and paternal self-control, assessed during a child's infancy, is associated with latent classes of child self-control based on assessments from eight waves of data spanning age 4 to age 15. Supplementary analyses were also performed using ordinary least squares regression to examine individual child self-control at each of the eight waves.

Results: The results indicate that higher maternal and paternal self-control is associated with latent class membership characterizing higher child self-control. Moreover, maternal and paternal self-control were found to be equally consequential for differentiating between a low self-control relative to a moderate self-control class, whereas maternal self-control was a slightly stronger predictor than paternal self-control for differentiating a low self-control relative to a higher self-control class. Supplementary OLS models revealed that both maternal and paternal self-control were statistically significant predictors of child self-control at 54 months of age and provided equal contributions. But, as the child ages, the influence of paternal self-control appears to decrease as compared to maternal self-control.

Conclusions: This study offers evidence that both maternal and paternal self-control are important for understanding the intergenerational continuity of self-control, but additional research with larger and more diverse samples is needed to better understand the relative importance of mothers and fathers for this community.

 

Dr. Thomas Craig

Buckley, P. J., Craig, T. D., & Mudambi, R. (2018). Time to learn? Assignment duration in global value chain organization. Journal of Business Research, (2018). https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jbusres.2018.01.011

ABSTRACT

In the examination of outsourcing and offshoring strategies to establish and orchestrate global value chains (GVCs), scholars have focused almost exclusively on two key decision dimensions – control and location – as the primary determinants of these complex organizational structures. However, the dynamic, temporal nature of GVCs can be further explained via a third organizing decision dimension that has received surprisingly little attention in this literature: time. This relates to the length of time that control and location settings are chosen ex ante to remain in effect. We explore this issue and assert that assignment durations are linked to activity type, and that mismatched durations can destroy value in even the most logically controlled and located GVC activities. We argue that while control and location are essential decisions for GVC orchestrators, how long these settings are in put into effect also plays a critical but overlooked role in efficient value chain organization.

Dr. Natalie A. Cyphers, Dr. Carol G. Mest, and Dr. Mary Elizabeth Doyle-Tadduni

       

Cyphers, NA, Mest, CG, Doyle-Tadduni. Effect of psychoacoustic learning on cardiac auscultation proficiency in nurse practitioner students. Nurse Educator, 2018. doi:10.1097/NNE.0000000000000585. [Epub ahead of print].

ABSTRACT

Background: Assessment is a vital role of all nurses, yet cardiac murmur identification remains difficult for students. Cardiac auscultation is a technical, not intellectual, skill, and a psychoacoustic approach to learning is recommended. Psychoacoustic approach involves repetition of cardiac sounds to facilitate auditory perceptual learning.

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine the effectiveness of a psychoacoustic learning modality for identification of cardiac murmurs ny nurse practitioner (NP) students.

Methods: A repeated-measures design was used. Following a pretest, NP students listened to repetitions of heart sounds, then took a posttest. Students were instructed to listen to the heart sounds weekly, then given pretests at 1 and 3 months.

Results: All posttest scores were higher than pretest scores; no significant difference in scores was noted between posttests.

Conclusions: Psychoacoustic learning may improve cardiac assessment. Further research is recommended with prelicensure nursing and NP students.

 

Dr. Laura Goudsouzian, Dr. Pranshu Gupta, Ms. Patricia Riola, and Ms. Karen Ruggles

        

L. Goudsouzian, P. Riola, K. Ruggles, P. Gupta and M. Mondoux, “Integrating Cell and Molecular Biology Concepts: Comparing Learning Gains and Self-Efficacy in Corresponding Live and Virtual Undergraduate Laboratory Experiences,” Journal of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Education. 2018

ABSTRACT

Multiple pedagogical approaches, such as experimental experiences or computer-based activities, have been shown to increase student learning and engagement. We have developed a laboratory module that includes both a traditional "live" experimental component and a student-designed "virtual" computer simulation component. This laboratory employs the mating pathway of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (yeast) to demonstrate four fundamental cell and molecular biology concepts: cell signaling, cytoskeleton, cell cycle, and cell cycle checkpoints. In the live laboratory, students add mating pheromone to cultures, then measure changes in cell division and morphology characteristics of the S. cerevisiae mating response. We also developed a "virtual" complement to this laboratory. Using the principles of Design Thinking and Agile methodology, we collaborated with an undergraduate Computer Science course to generate two computer simulations which can support the live laboratory or provide a virtual laboratory experience. We assessed how both the live and virtual laboratories contributed to learning gains in analytical skills and course content. Students who performed the simulation alone or the simulation plus live lab demonstrated learning gains, with greater gains for the live lab, but students who performed neither lab did not. Attitudinal assessment demonstrated increased student engagement and self-efficacy after performing the live and virtual labs.

Dr. Pranshu Gupta

L. Goudsouzian, P. Riola, K. Ruggles, P. Gupta and M. Mondoux, “Integrating Cell and Molecular Biology Concepts: Comparing Learning Gains and Self-Efficacy in Corresponding Live and Virtual Undergraduate Laboratory Experiences,” Journal of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Education. 2018

ABSTRACT

Multiple pedagogical approaches, such as experimental experiences or computer-based activities, have been shown to increase student learning and engagement. We have developed a laboratory module that includes both a traditional "live" experimental component and a student-designed "virtual" computer simulation component. This laboratory employs the mating pathway of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (yeast) to demonstrate four fundamental cell and molecular biology concepts: cell signaling, cytoskeleton, cell cycle, and cell cycle checkpoints. In the live laboratory, students add mating pheromone to cultures, then measure changes in cell division and morphology characteristics of the S. cerevisiae mating response. We also developed a "virtual" complement to this laboratory. Using the principles of Design Thinking and Agile methodology, we collaborated with an undergraduate Computer Science course to generate two computer simulations which can support the live laboratory or provide a virtual laboratory experience. We assessed how both the live and virtual laboratories contributed to learning gains in analytical skills and course content. Students who performed the simulation alone or the simulation plus live lab demonstrated learning gains, with greater gains for the live lab, but students who performed neither lab did not. Attitudinal assessment demonstrated increased student engagement and self-efficacy after performing the live and virtual labs.

 

P. Gupta, “Flipping classroom for Generation Y,” International Journal of Innovation and Research in Educational Sciences, vol. 5, issue 1, 2018.

ABSTRACT

Flipping classroom is becoming a popular practice but the necessity of using a digital tool to flip a classroom has been questioned. The challenge is how we can use the concept effectively for any course at all levels of education. Depending on the course content, appropriate digital tools are needed to reinforce the course content in a flipped classroom. A simple quiz like assignment becomes tedious and boring and is not very effective for enforcement and retention of material. Experiencing this issue in the classroom, the author decided to use a web application that allows to create an interactive learning environment using videos from various sources. By using this tool, the author was able to use the classroom for explaining major concepts and complete hands-on labs. The students were required to use the interactive videos to focus on the other aspects of the content outside the classroom such as terminology and further enforcing logic. This tool has been used for three consecutive years in the classroom and has proved successful in flipping the classroom as needed.

 

P. Gupta, “Formalization of Mutation Operators,” Journal of Computer Science Applications and Information Technology, vol. 3, no. 1, 2018.

Abstract

Software testing is a significant phase in any software development lifecycle irrespective of the type of software being developed. The main goal of software testing phase is to minimize the software faults in a system and increase its reliability. A software fault is an unintended mistake that causes failure of the system or any system component. Therefore, it is vital that the system is tested for most faults. One of the popular approaches to achieve a fault-free system is to induce, test and remove the faults from the system, commonly known as Mutation Testing. It uses mutation operators to induce and test faults in program. Furthermore, a software fault type (a textual description of a specific kind of fault that can occur in any program) encompasses one or more mutation operators. As the mutation operators induce a specific fault in the program, there is a need for a formal definition for each mutation operator representing a precise software fault that falls under an explicit software fault type. Literature research shows the lack of formalization of mutation operator definitions and as a consequence, it becomes difficult to induce a precise fault in a program. In this paper, the author illustrates a formal methodology to define mutation operator to induce a specific fault in programs written using object-oriented programming languages. The formalization of operators shows the need for new mutation operators that have not been defined for object-oriented programs.

 

Gupta, P., Stanescu, A., and Mata-Toledo, R. (2018). Internet of things. In AccessScience. McGraw-Hill Education.

ABSTRACT

The concept by which Internet or network connectivity, computing capabilities, and collection and exchange of data extend to everyday objects that are not computers. In the Internet of things (IoT), devices work with minimal human intervention to transform the way we work, live, and play. For example, modern thermostats, lights, refrigerators, and other appliances can all connect to IoT devices for automation. The model of combining computers, sensors, and networks for a specific purpose has existed for decades, but the advancement in technology has made the IoT more widespread. The primary enabling technologies of the IoT are RFID (radio-frequency identification), low-energy Bluetooth/wireless/radio, NFC (near-field communication), Internet Protocol (IP)–based networking, and cloud computing. Everyday objects combined with Internet connectivity and data analytic capabilities can create a more efficient living and working environment. Therefore, the IoT has brought in a new era of machines that make our lives easier. 

 

Gupta, P, Mata-Toledo, R. A., & Stanescu, A.. (2018). Machine learning. In AccessScience. McGraw-Hill Education. 

ABSTRACT

A branch of artificial intelligence (AI) based on the notion that machines (software applications) can learn from examples and can teach themselves how to solve specific problems without being programmed manually. Recent successes in artificial intelligence have resulted from exponential growth in computational power as well as data generation, allowing machine learning (ML) to spread to other sectors beyond computing sciences. Some of the breakthroughs in data-driven AI are already present in our day-to-day lives, in the form of spam filters, automated fraud detection in financial transactions or insurance claims, conversational agents, digital personal assistants, visual search and photo tagging, speech recognition, and recommendation systems. Other fields in which machine learning is key to decision making are medicine, astronomy, biology, chemistry, genetics, finance, politics, and industrial robotics. In the future, machines will become smarter and will continue to significantly transform our lives. In fact, when presented with sufficient data, software applications can even learn novel things that no programmer or domain expert could teach them explicitly. 

 

Dr. Renee Koval

McDonagh, J. G., Haren, W. B., Valvano, M., Grubaugh, A. L., Wainwright, F. C., Rhue, C. H., … York, J. A. (2019). Cultural Change: Implementation of a Recovery Program in a Veterans Health Administration Medical Center Inpatient Unit. Journal of the American Psychiatric Nurses Association25(3), 208–217. 

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION:The Freedom Commission’s recommendations, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration’s framework, and policy directives on recovery-oriented services have fueled the recovery transformation. Mental health recovery services have been implemented in a broad range of outpatient settings. However, psychiatric inpatient units remained embedded in the traditional model of care. AIMS:The purpose of this article is to describe an ongoing quality improvement implementation of recovery services in a Veterans Health Administration acute psychiatric inpatient unit. METHOD: An interprofessional Partnership for Wellness delivered 4 to 6 hours per day of evidence-based recovery and holistic population-specific health programs. Veteran, system, and program indicators were measured. RESULTS: Preliminary indicators over a 2-year period suggest that Veterans rated group content and relevance high, pre–post psychiatric rehospitalization rates decreased by 46%, and fidelity to recommended strategies was high. CONCLUSIONS:The project success reflects strong leadership, a partnership of committed staff, effective training, and an organizational culture exemplifying excellence in Veteran services and innovation.

Dr. R. Scott Mattingly and Mr. J. Bennett Durham

        

 

Mattingly, R. S., Durham, J. B., & Shupp, M. R. (2018). Free Expression and Political Correctness: Contextualizing the Controversies and Finding a Way Forward. In J. L. DeVitis & P. A. Sasso (Eds.) Colleges at the crossroads: Taking sides on contested issues. New York, NY: Peter Lang Publishing.

"Free Expression and Political Correctness: Contextualizing the Controversies and Finding a Way Forward" Our chapter explores the circumstances that have contributed to the growing inability of our culture to promote free and open dialogue between individuals from diverse cultural and ideological groups. We believe that colleges and universities have an obligation to lead by example in creating campus cultures that embrace our common humanity while equitably addressing the needs of diverse constituencies.

 

Dr. Richard Noll

Noll, R. (2018). Feeling and smelling psychosis: American alienism, psychiatry, prodromes and the limits of 'category work.' History of the Human Sciences, 31(2), 22-41.

ABSTRACT

Some Limitations of 'category work' in the history of psychiatry are illustrated via the example of attempts within US alienism and psychiatry since 1889 to identify psychosis and its prodromes. A slowly evolving acceptance of the need for specifiable biological disease concepts, distinct diagnostic categories and defined boundaries of the 'before and after' of psychosis among some elite physicians challenged widespread vernacular methods of diagnosis expressed as intuition, feelings or scent as well as local practices of creating novel placeholder terms 'as needed' or using question marls to express liminality or confusion. When 'error of diagnosis' emerged as a concern circa 1909, the professional transformation of this 'scientific self of subjectivity' of the psychiatrist into a 'scientific self of objectivity' eventually resulted in the turn to numerical judgments based on rating scales for psychotic symptoms. However, rating scales do not 'count' anything at all and exist as instruments of liminality between subjective clinical opinion and the affection of objectivity that quantification symbolizes.

Dr. Katherine Ramsland

                                                                                                                                                   

 

Ramsland, K. (2018). The psychology of death investigations: Behavioral analysis for psychological autopsy and criminal profiling. Boca Raton, FL: CRC Press.

The Psychology of Death Investigations outlines definitively how behavioral evidence can often provide the necessary components and "missing pieces" to complement physical evidence as an essential tool for incident reconstruction. In order to determine the direction of an investigation and to prioritize leads, if necessary, death investigators must establish the manner of a death: natural, accident, homicide or suicide. The most overlooked aspect of death investigation is the psychological dimension, which can provide unique leads, correct false assumptions, enhance investigative awareness, and solve cases in surprising ways.

In an estimated 10–20% of cases, the manner of death cannot be determined, or worse, has been erroneously categorized.  Since many jurisdictions can’t afford behavioral consultants, this book has been written to provide practical information for a basic psychological analysis. If the circumstances surrounding a death are equivocal, psychological consultants can compile information retrospectively about a deceased person’s mental state and possible motive to assist with unravelling ambiguity about the manner of death. This is the primary function of a psychological autopsy, and, as such, this is the first book of its kind dedicated solely to the topic. In the event that the manner of death is determined to be a homicide, behavioral profiling can help to focus the potential pool of suspects.  

Professionals and students alike will benefit from the exercise of cognitive awareness and the application of psychological logic presented.  Psychologists, medical examiners, coroners, attorneys, fraud examiners, law enforcement personnel, death and homicide investigators, and students enrolled in criminal profiling, forensic psychology, and criminal justice programs will find this text to be a compelling and insightful reference to add to their professional toolkit.

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