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Avoiding Plagiarism

This guide provides tips on what constitutes plagiarism as well as tutorials and tips on methods to improve your research skills.

Public Services Librarian

Jessica Burkhardt
Contact:
610-282-1100 x 1443

From the DeSales Catalog:

PLAGIARISM

Plagiarism describes the act of copying the ideas, and/or speculations, and/or language of any other person or persons, without acknowledgement, and presenting this material as one's own original work in order to satisfy any academic requirement or complete any academic project. Plagiarism takes place even in the event that a person makes any use of another person's unique and distinctive terminology, whether it be a single word or phrase or extended passage, without acknowledgement. This need not be verbatim use; it is considered plagiarism when a person uses his or her own language to alter the original expression of the ideas or speculations of another person or persons.

Plagiarism also takes place when a person disguises the language of another person or persons by altering the formal elements of the original (e.g., diction, syntax, grammar, punctuation) and submitting it as his or her own, without acknowledgement, to satisfy any academic requirement or complete an academic project.

Plagiarism will be considered to have occurred regardless of the person's intent to deceive.

The following acts will be deemed acts of plagiarism, though the list is not exhaustive:

1. Presenting published or unpublished work prepared by others, or dictated by others, as your own, including papers purchased or borrowed from any person or organization;

2. Presenting, as your own, lab reports or exercises copied from or dictated by others;

3. Presenting, as your own, homework assignments of any kind copied from or dictated by others;

4. Presenting, as your own, oral reports copied from or dictated by others;

5. Incorporating formal lecture notes into your own work without acknowledgement and presenting them as your own;

6. Presenting, as your own, a computer solution developed by someone else;

7. Copying the ideas, and/or speculations, and/or language of any other person or persons, without acknowledgement, and presenting this as one's own work.